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of the fourth estate in burma and beyond, when global post's charlie senate joins us ahead. [ other merv ] welcome back to the cleaning games. let's get a recap, merv. [ merv ] thanks, other merv. mr. clean magic eraser extra power was three times faster on permanent marker. elsewhere against dirt, it was a sweep, with scuffed sports equipment... had it coming. grungy phones... oh! super dirty! and grimy car rims... wow! that really works! ...all taking losses. it looks like mr. clean has won everything. the cleaning games are finished? and so are we. okay, but i just took a mortgage out on the cabinet. [ male announcer ] clean more, work less, with the mr. clean magic eraser extra power. [ male announcer ] clean more, work less, [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. what that's great. it won't take long, will it? no. okay. this, won't take long will it? n
continues. now to burma where dramatic footage emerged showing police standing by as gangs attack and kill muslims. it shows a shot belonging to a muslim being attacked. human rights groups are questioning whether sanctions against the country should have been lifted. >> looming over burma, violence that targets a minority and threatens a nation's future. these images were captured last month. mobs ransacked a shop in the entral town. after news spread that a monk had been killed, there was more violence. a man badly burned lies on the ground. the image is too graphic to show. the instinct of mercy overwhelmed by hatred. the police, heavily outnumbered, stand by. on the second day police reinforcements arrive but the killing and burning goes on. a young muslim is dragged out and hacked to death. violence against muslims erupted last june when thousands were driven from their homes in western burma. w a reports accuses ethnic cleansing of the minority living there. >> what we have found is that the government and security forces are responsible for attacks in which crimes against humanity w
? they came and went. the results ignored, opposition punished or silenced entirely. burma, now myanmar, where orwell had once served as a colonial policeman, where he first had grown to despise the apparatus of a colonial state, became even more orwellian than imagined, in a nation where even having an opinion could be dangerous. >> i am very honored to be here at this university and to be the first president of the united states of america to visit your country. >> morning in yangon, to nearly everyone's surprise, there have been some huge changes in recent months. >> difficult time in any transition is when we think that success is in front. >> nobel prize-winning democracy champion, aung san suu kyi, after 15 years in house arrest, was released, now taking an active role in politics. just as the door is opening, our crew is the first to record what's happening in decades. meanwhile, this southeast asian country of 80 million is collectively holding its breath, waiting to see what's next, and will this loosening of government grip last? of course, morning in yangon has always been about tea
entirely. burma, now myanmar, where orwell once served as a colonial policeman, where he first had grown to despise the apparatus of a colonial state, make more orwellian than imagined, in a nation where even having an opinion could be dangerous. >> i am very honored to be here at this university and to be the first president of the united states of america to visit your country. >> morning in yangon, to nearly everyone's surprise, there have been some huge changes in recent months. >> difficult time in transition is when we think that success is -- >> nobel prizewinning democracy champion, aung san suu kyi, after 15 years in house arrest, was released, now taking an active part in with the doors opening, our crew is the first -- meanwhile, this southeast asian country of 80 million is collectively holding its breath, waiting to see what's next, and will this loosening of government grip last? of course, morning in yangon has always been about tea. it's black indian-style tea, usually with a thick dollop of sweetened condensed milk. you want it sweet this less sweet? very sweet? strong?
with singapore or myanmar or burma. the way we organize our discussion was to have input and two fantastic experts people with perspective. it will result in a good discussion. i do not know about a debate. i think a discussion with points of view is always a good way to suss out some of the policy issues. i will introduce both speakers and then we will start with lieutenant-general chip gregson. chip is assistant secretary of defense for asian-pacific security affairs. before that he served as a cheap operating officer for the united states olympic committee. he knows a little something in terms of hands on experience. he was commanding general of the marine corps in the asia- pacific. over 70,000manage .arines and sailors from 2001-2003 he was commanding general of the marine corps forces in japan. prior to that he was director of asia pacific policy and the a secretary of defense. he was a graduate of the u.s. naval academy and hold a couple of masters degrees. director of the human rights watch. his portfolio includes south and southeast asia, a region he knows quite a bit about. befor
. at the moment, the talk of peace is talk but little else. a century, burma was isolated from the rest of the world. run by a military dictatorship with an iron grip. after the release of opposition leader aung san suu kyi in 2010, there were signs of change. at the same time, -- simmering tensions have increased. violence between buddhist and muslims have left dozens dead in recent weeks. the muslim quarter, scavenger's search for anything left of value. the families that live here are gone. the committee dated back many generations has been wiped out. what began as a row escalated with frightening speed. people had been enraged by the news that a nun had been murdered. we went to the shock wears started. the police arrived, but there was not enough of them, he said. the crowd got too big for them to control. then, the killing began. 20 boys from a muslim school were cut down and burned on the spot. >> they were shouting, they killed armonk, yesterday. we must kill them. monk y killed our yesterday. >> how do you feel about that? >> i feel disgusted and ashamed. >> their rage at seeme
and sanctions against a country which is also known as burma. aung san suu kyi's national league for democracy, the largest opposition, won 43 of the 45 seats up for grabs last year, in parliament bye elections, she became a member of parliament. she said her country still has a long way to go. >> for me, reform means real change in the lives of our people. and i don't think there has been enough progress in that direction. i think most people in burma would say that there has been no real change in their lives since 2010. >> reporter: the nobel laureate has suggested she's ready to further the push for democracy. by working with the military and other forces, her former opponents. >> we've always said that the key to a better future for our country is national reconciliation. it's cooperation, and working together towards, towards shared aspirations and shared goals. >> reporter: some experts say aung san suu kyi could be president following an election in 2015. >> i'm confident that there's every chance that i can become president of this country. but i would not like to say i'm confident th
is also known as burma. aung san suu kyi's national league for demracy, the largest opposition, won 43 of the 45 seats up for grabs last year in parliamentary bi-elections. she became a member of parliament. she says her country still has a long way to go. >> for me reform means real change in the lives of our people, and i don't think there has been enough progress in that direction. i think most people in burma would say that there has been no real change in their lives since 2010. >> reporter: the nobel laureate has suggested she's ready to further the push for democracy by working with the military and other forces, her former opponents. >> we've always said that the key to a better future for our country is national reconciliation. it's cooperation and it's working together toward -- toward shared aspirations and shared goals. >> reporter: some experts say aung san suuyi could be president following an election in 2015. >> i'm confident that there's every chance that i can become president of this country. but i would not like to say i'm confident that i will become president of t
is also known as burma. aung san suu kyi's national league for democracy, the largest opposition, won 43 of the 45 seats up for grabs last year in parliamentary bi-elections. she became a member of parliament. she says her country still has a long way to go. >> for me reform means real change in the lives of our people, and i don't think there has been enough progress in that direction. i think most people in burma would say that there has been no real change in their lives since 2010. >> reporter: the nobel laureate has suggested she's ready to further the push for democracy by working with the military and other forces, her former opponents. >> we've always said that the key to a better future for our country is national reconciliation. it's cooperation and it's working together toward -- toward shared aspirations and shared goals. >> reporter: some experts say aung san suu kyi could be president following an election in 2015. >> i'm confident that there's every chance that i can become president of this country. but i would not like to say i'm confident that i will become president of
and nations eased sanctions against the country, which is also known as burma. aung san suu kyi's national league for democracy, the largest opposition, won 43 of the 45 seats up for grabs last year in parliamentary bi-elections. she became a member of parliament. she says her country still has a long way to go. >> for me reform means real change in the lives of our people, and i don't think there has been enough progress in that direction. i think most people in burma would say that there has been no real change in their lives since 2010. >> reporter: the nobel laureate has suggested she's ready to further the push for democracy by working with the military and other forces, her former opponents. >> we've always said that the key to a better future for our country is national reconciliation. it's cooperation and it's working together toward -- toward shared aspirations and shared goals. >> reporter: some experts say aung san suu kyi could be president following an election in 2015. >> i'm confident that there's every chance that i can become president of this country. but i would not like
is -- book is the trip to burma. >> guest: i love that chapter. >> host: just talk about what made that trip so unique, obviously not many people are traveling to burma from the united states at that time. >> guest: more and more certainly at the time it was hardly anyone. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to when you look at the big picture of what, you know, my book will do for readers. this is a book that is several things. it's, you know, my personal story, my perspective on american power. it is the story of hillary clinton as secretary of state and her approach to the american leadership and the concept of smart power which we can talk about later. how do you do business as a global leader in a challenging world? but it's also a portrait of the woman, you know, this historic figure in the united politician like her or whether you like her or don't like her. she is a global stature. she's a celebrity. she's a big personality. she's been in the public eye for several decades. but i think that readers will disoifer dr discover things about her they didn't know and s
to brazil, went to cuba. we went to cuba. we went to vietnam. we went to burma. spain, to italy, morocco, south africa, kenya. in 2006 i'm not -- we ended up creating a friendship with them. his last words were to me in 2006 was, remember christian and muslims, we are all brothers. i went and spent two days with him. i think i learned a really important lessons about travel at about the importance and significance of it. that is, muslims and christians, just as he said, he wasn't an educated guy but he was a smart guy. but whatever was we have more kinship with people around the world than we have difference. fascinating to go to burma, aung san suu kyi, should still under house arrest them, to see the situation. to me burma was a lot like cuba. and that is very repressive, totalitarian societies. and see a world in which you can't, you're going to a bookstore and there are maybe 20 books in the bookstore. everything is censored. or go to cuba and try to find an internet cafÉ and you can't find one. to see situations where people don't have the freedoms that we often take for granted, w
. it seems the government of burma is very good at setting a national level committees to rook at problems, but very poo in implementing a meaningful solution that will protect lives and property. there need to be clear orders to the police to maintain order. also, make an example of people who are felt to have been involved in violence. they should be held accountable to the law. >> religious tension has existed for a long time in myanmar. the partly civilian government replacing military rule, the tensions are being exposed. francis has given the power of the vatican bringing an end to this year's easter celebration for catholics from world. thousands of people filled st. peter's square for the service. byis usually accompanied doreen of the bill for the call to prayer. a day of mourning after least 10 people killed by flash floods. most victims were trapped in their cars near the capital. the island has been experiencing heavy rain since saturday. the president says he will release of political prisoners. the president called for talks with of political parties, including armed groups.
of the democratic voice of burma, and independent media organization located in oslo. how significant is today for the press and for the people? >> it is a very positive development. we all work in the market because it is ending the monopoly of the state newspaper. the people have a choice to read the news from us. it is a positive development. it will lead to more democracy. we welcome this news. >> not much of a choice yet. there are only four dailies. the government did grant more than a dozen licenses. what happened? >> it is very short notice for many newspapers to publish in such short notice. they have to switch from weekly to daily. i believe we will see more newspapers in the market. >> i saw the enthusiasm on people's faces talking about politics freely when i was in and gone recently. -- when i was in and gone -- in yangon recently. will we see that in the media sector? >> i hope so. they are very much expecting changes. we also are experiencing this media freedom -- expecting us to last for at least one year. even my organization can now operate in the country, dealing with the re
to burma should the situation change there. but the survey results are a real surprise. >> reporter: this is one of the refugees who said he hopes to go on living here. he runs a restaurant in central tokyo that serves myanmar-style cuisine. he lives with his wife and teenage children. his son and daughter were born in japan. they have never visited myanmar. >> translator: do you want to go to myanmar or not? >> translator: i want to stay here. >> translator: how about a university in myanmar? >> translator: university students i see in town seem to be enjoying themselves and look so cool. >> translator: any plans after you graduate? >> translator: moving to myanmar after graduation? no way. i'd have to start from scratch. >> translator: he was in the audience when aung san suu kyi spoke. >> translator: i'd like not only those to return to myanmar but also those who stay in japan to think about their home country. >> translator: he made up his mind to support myanmar's democratization but he plans to remain in japan. >> translator: my children don't like living in myanmar. i wondere
. >> coming up on this weekend's show, you travel to myanmar, country formerly known as burma. that's a place i've been fascinated by. my first reporting assignment i snuck into burma with the rebels, hooked up with some students fighting the burmese government in 1991. but i haven't been there since. what's it like? >> there's the sense that i'm sure you felt even more intensely, wow, i'm sighing some incredibly beautiful things and nobody else has seen them. the temple complex is as impressive and yet very few people have seen it. it is an incredibly beautiful country. what i found remarkable about myanmar, aside from its beauty, which is just spectacular -- i've been to a lot of places 20 years after the soviets left, 30 years and people still shy away from the camera. they still don't want to talk to you. they see a camera, it's bad things. they close up at the approach of an outsider here. myanmar, place where just about a year ago you were tossed in jail for consorting with foreigners, everybody was incredibly open. oh, yeah. this is the good stuff. >> what is it? >> yakatori. they're j
, the vietnam, burma, spain, italy to morocco, south africa, kenya. to those a 6i met a driver in egypt in alexandria, egypt. of course, we try to avoid connecting with him, what we ended up creating a. and to does a six, remember christian and muslim, altogether spent two days of them. i think airlines are really important lesson in the semester s.c. about travel, but the importance and significance of it. muslims and christians, just as you said, and educated. you're a smart guy. and a learned was we have more kinship with people around the world that we have difference. it was fascinating to go to burma before. see the situation. to me it was a lot like cuba. is very repressive. near totalitarian. and to see a world in which he go into a bookstore and there are maybe 20 bucks in that bookstore. everything is censored. go to cuba and try to find an internet cafe, and you can't find one. to see situations where people don't have the freedoms that we often take for granted here was eliminating, would say. i believe firmly in the spirit -- experiential learning. it is wanting to read joh
, it transforms burma dramatically as we speak. of wherever you look at the globe, you have it. even in my old neighborhood, slovenia, bulgaria. under the pressure of the popular movement, the government resigned. the new coalitions are made. the system is changing. so one big thing is if this is so much around us, how much do we foe about it? which brings us to another question. so my first question is, when you look at your library, when you look at the library of this lovely building, you probably have a lot of the history books. so be you take a random -- if you take a random book from history, what percentage of this book is about the wars and violence? pretty big. how many movies you've seen about one single stupid vietnamese war? ten? fifteen? twenty? how many good movies about nonviolent struggle? how many good movies about martin luther king? one, maybe two? movies about gandhi, one with ben kingsley. thanks to sean penn, one good movie about harvey milk, and that's about it. you look at the books and the movies will be this tiny little thing. so how come and how in the relates to the
to try to build a stronger and for your burma. or as we also saw, the libyans who filled freedom square in benghazi, first to bring down a dictator, and then again to let libya's democratal ected government no other demands. the rights that these men and women struggled for reflect values that we as americans hold dear. they are key to our dna. they are who we are as a country, they are the bedrock of our nation. but they aren't exclusively a american values, and i want to stress that. they are not american rights. they are not western values or western rights. they belong to all people, and all governments have a responsibility to protect and promote these rights. that's what we call them universal rights. and yet promoting human rights isn't a foreign policy, and it's not a foreign policy priority simply because it's the right thing to do. it's time to our own security. it's tied to the possibilities of prosperity and of nations living by rule of law and of nation's living in peace. countries where strong human rights prevail our countries where people do better, economies thrive, rul
are promising and the old guard is old guard. and after all, the person driving in burma is not a young officer, you know. it's an old one. with the tni it's very interesting with a is going on. maybe the pentagon is right. maybe things have gotten better recently the eight indonesia soldiers were killed by the local insurgency there. which is very small and innocuous in many respect but still has some lethal capacity. and we expected them to go nuts. that's what they have done in the past. they didn't. but as i said some folks at osd a few weeks ago that one can say a they have reform, there's evidence -- we have evidence that a lot of impunity if things get bloody enough there could be more abuses. neither of us has the evidence to say we are right and the other is wrong. we are both sort of arguing with each other with ante-dote and we don't have a lot to go with. there are places like cambodia where i know we're right. the pentagon has a big problem. there's -- you find a couple of navy unit. a couple of young officers who aren't involved in any political activity. we can train them maritim
me just say that the fact that we did not find anything does not mean anything. burma is a black box. and the office of the secretary of defense for the first to agree. the intelligence file on the country and its leadership is then. it is bars not because there's not enough information out there -- it is sparse not -- not there is an off enough information out there. it is because it is literally just not there. commanders mean that joins us who happen to be here in 1986 did not lead a unit and slaughter a bunch of people. it just means that nobody wrote it down. that is the problem you see again and again. less so in indonesia and thailand and pakistan, but definitely more so in burma and cambodia and other places where there is not a lot of hard, written down evidence what the history is. and then you add on top of that transliteration problems with the data that does exist and you of a recipe for a lot of misplaced assumptions. you just do not know what you are dealing with. your vote -- you have what donald rumsfeld would call a lot of unknowns and nuns. unknowns.n a that ms.usi
as i did before this interview and get a host of information. you were recently in burma. you were recently in north korea. you believe and this book goes into detail how this can advance humankind in a lot of ways, but yet these governments are resistant to allowing the internet into the countries. >> remember, we're in a shift in empowerment. we're adding another 5 billion people to this on-line conversation. that's great for medicine, for education, for commerce. it makes the world a safer place. getting these people educated means a safer america. the problem if you're a dictator is getting them educated gives them choices, they're going to overthrow you and so forth. so the dictators are fighting this. in burma now, they decided to open it up. so we'll see how well they get through this transition. in north korea where we both were, i don't know that they're going to open it up or not 'cause they understand if it shows up, people will discover how corrupt the regime is. >> sean: you think the arab spring, either one of you can jump in, i'm not ignoring you -- the arab spring y
as burma. they created a meal for us. i want you to watch it and get your reaction afterwards. >> reporter: joshua williams moved to the u.s. in 2009 to start a new wife with his wife and two children, but remaining connected to his burmese culture is important. and cooking is a way to do it. this is just for the color. it gives you smooth skin. in burma we used to say the word -- the food is medicine and medicine is our food. every single meal we have garlic, ginger, onion. we say the bone makes taste better. >> reporter: he's making a fish soup with rice noodle and burmese curry chicken with coconut rice. in his home country they pride themselves on the bold flavors they achieve. it becomes somewhat of a competition among the cooks. >> burmese food smell very strong. in our country when you have a meal, if your dog -- no, you don't have a good meal. >> william suggests that in myanmar this meal would require a little more work and is not for the squeamish. >> the whole chicken, the whole process we do ourselves. but here it was so easy to do those things. we cook noodles separately and t
. throughout her long years under house arrest in burma, separated from her husband and her two young boys, the heroic dissidents aung san suu kyi was sustained by poster she put up on her wall. was a poster from the 1995 united nations first world conference on women in beijing. it was signed by the woman whose words at that conference served to motivate millions of others. you know those words first uttered by hillary clinton wearing that pink first lady suit at the podium in beijing. she said it there is one message that echoes from the conference, let it be that human rights are women's rights, and women's rights are human rights, once and for all. [cheers and applause] when hillary clinton spoke those words, killed in the patriarchal power struggle were ready to hear them. there were still were prepared for the earth words to reverberate through to succeeding decades. we hear there and go in the voice of one of our co hearst's, the fearless somali doctor who has created a safe civil society on her family's lanford tens of thousands of internally displaced people. we will hear from a w
arrest in burma, separated from her husband and her two young boys, the heroic dissidents aung san suu kyi was sustained by poster she put up on her wall. was a poster from the 1995 united nations first world conference on women in beijing. it was signed by the woman whose words at that conference served to motivate millions of others. you know those words first uttered by hillary clinton wearing that pink first lady suit at the podium in beijing. she said it there is one message that echoes from the conference, let it be that human rights are women's rights, and women's rights are human rights, once and for all. [cheers and applause] when hillary clinton spoke those words, killed in the patriarchal power struggle were ready to hear them. there were still were prepared for the earth words to reverberate through to succeeding decades. we hear there and go in the voice of one of our co hearst's, the fearless somali doctor who has created a safe and peaceful civil society on her family's lanford tens of thousands of internally displaced people. -- land for tens of thousands of internally
reported hurt. burma. hundreds of people paying respects to 13 children killed in a fire at a muslim school. dozens other kids escaped through a door that knocked open. authorities electrical problems. police are investigating the head of the mosque and a teacher for negligence. ripping open explosion apartment tm gas station southern he can gland. police say thieves shut it off and took cash from the machine. the blast apparently shook some homes but no word of anybody hurt. cops say they have captured one suspect. thailand. workers at a bangkok zoo giving animals some relief as temperatures top 100 degrees. ice cream for the chimps and the bears while the elephants chow down on blocks of ice and frozen vegetables. workers are spraying water on the animals to prevent heat stroke and that's a wrap on this fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. doctor also tell you getting in shape. seems nothing beat competition and cash. that's according to a study in the money is great moat vartd for hospital workers to lose weight. they lost three times as much when they were come competing against eac
for the defense cooperation in areas of maritime security and disaster relief and peacekeeping support. in burma we have resumed working to work in military operations and working to make sure they support the ongoing and dynamic reforms. with the vietnamese, we are expanding cooperation as set forth in a new memorandum of understanding. maritime security, search and rescue, peacekeeping, and humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. in malaysia, indonesia, we are similarly working to build partner capacity and conduct maritime security and humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. with china, we have invited the chinese to participate in the rim pac exercise, and are delighted to have accepted. we seek to strengthen and grow our military to military relationship with china. commence rate with our growing economic and political relationship, a building in sustaining a positive and constructive relationship with china is essential to the success of our rebalancing strategy. finally, india, a key part of the rebalance, and more broadly, an emerging power we believe will help determine the br
known as burma. that's a place i was fascinated with in my early reporting. i was back there in '91. it's really opened up in the last couple years. i haven't been there to official myanmar. what's it like? >> there's that sense that i'm sure you felt, even more intensely that, wow, i'm seeing some really incredibly beautiful things, and nobody else has seen them. bagan is a temple complex that's impressive, and very few people have seen it. it's an incredibly beautiful country. what i found remarkable about myanmar, aside from its beauty, which is just spectacular, i've been to a lot of places 20 years after the soviets left, 30 years, and people still shy away from the camera. they still don't want to talk to you. they see a camera, it means it's a bad thing. they are -- they close up at the approach of an outsider. here, myanmar, a place where about a year ago, you're tossed in jail for consorting with foreigners. everybody was incredibly open. oh, yeah, this is the good stuff. >> what is it? >> yakotori. they're delightful little bits of chicken. i don't know whether that's skin or
was recently contemplating a drone strike kill in burma against a drug trafficker. this is going to happen more anç more. and if obama is not willing to articulate and abide by clear rules that limit when these killings can occur, you can just imagine how the loophole is going to be exploited by others. >> wes, you have seen combat and you know we talk a lot about the fog of war. there's also the sort of how this is furthering our long-term foreign policy and national security goals. and you look at what has happened in pakistan. disapproval of u.s. leadership under obama, 92%s of country disapproves of the president, 4% approves. and most outside analysis that's due in large part because of the use of drone strikes inside the country. >> i think it's important for people to understand what exactly that is and what that means. literally you have these aerial drones which are completely out of any type of visual view. and a person whether he's sleeping there or any type of confinement. a missile that can take out an entire area. the danger that i have and again this also goes back to the challe
project? >> the only play that i was really sort of nervous was in burma. i had my 15-year-old daughter with me. and we were followed by the secret police when we left. i thought we would be okay, but i was concerned that they might confiscate my film. i didn't quite know, and any of' never been followed by the secret police and had to make an escape before. that was a little bit anxiety provoking. >> michael: i can only imagine. let's move to some of those profiles we saw. jimmy carter, president jimmy carter was the first president to make humans rights a cornerstone of u.s. foreign policy. tell me about your conversation with president carter. >> one of the things that interested me, he was--what he said about impunity, where he said that he varied a bit from more pure rights activists. he said he wasn't necessarily opposed to giving wretched dictators impunity if it meant that they would step down sooner. they were afraid of being prosecuted by the international criminal court, and because of that they're not willing to give up. they stay and they fight. but if you gave them impunit
round of election in china, more robing jordan, transform from burma. whenever you look at the globe, you have it. even in my own neighborhood bulgaria, under the pressure of the popular movement, the government resign new coalitions are made, the system is changed. so one big thing is if this is so much around us, how much do we know about it? which brings us to another question. so my first question is when you look at your library and the of the lovely building you have a lot in history books. if you take a random books in history, what percentage of this book is about a war and violence ? take a pick. how many movies have you seen about one single stupid vietnamese war? ten? fifteen? twenty? how many good movies about the struggle? how many good movies about -- [inaudible] one, maybe two? movies about began i -- began i did is one. thanks to sean penn one good movie. and that's about it. the nonviolation struggle -- will be this tiny little thing. so how come and how this relates to history? i had the pleasure of dealing with this both in [inaudible] and normally start with a que
down the line. the two biggest problems are implicated. you have certain military like burma and cambodia and thailand, which you have some unit or even the whole are involved revenue -- a lot of commanders in cambodia are essentially , i mean, the prime minister is announced corporate sponsorship. or military unit. when there's a land cosession and the people have to be moved off the land and security needs to be called in to do that, the local military commanders are called in. they're nauticalled in as government we said to -- [inaudible] and we said at times you have to push military not in so many pieces but on the revenue transparency. and then the issue of them being involved in private business needs to be pushed, you know, the idea that it is not appropriate for military to be in business. it needs to be pushed. and i think, you know, again we're for dialogue. it's not about cutting them off. it's about telling them what is up and what they need to do to change things. very quickly about the moral issue in cambodia. human rights watch obviously agrees. there's a mora
working alongside her former captors to try to build a stronger and for your -- and freer burma. what the libyans who filled freedom square in benghazi -- or the libyans who filled freedom square in benghazi. the right to these men and women the but values that we have americans hold dear. they are key to our dna. of ourthe bedrock nation. but they aren't exclusively american values. they're not american rights. they are not western values or western rights. they belong to all the bull and andhey belong to aoll eppeople all permits have the right to attack these rights. that's why they call them universal rights. promoting human rights and not a foreign policy priority because it is the right thing to do. securityd to our own and the possibilities of prosperity and nations living by the rule of law and in peace. countries were strong human rights prevail our countries where people to better. economies thrive, rule of law and stronger, governments are more effect than responsive. -- and responsive. there are countries lead on the world stage and project. a country is likely doing well
, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, and peacekeeping support. in burma, we have resumed limited military to military relations and are working to ensure the burmese military supports burma's ongoing and dynamic reforms. with the vietnamese, we are expanding our cooperation as set forth in a new memorandum of understanding, maritime security, searching and rescue, peacekeeping, and humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. in malaysia and indonesia, we are similarly working to build partner capacity and conduct maritime security and humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. with china we have invited the chinese to participate in the recommend pack exercise which we host, and we are delighted that they have accepted. we seek to strengthen and grow our military to military relationship with china. commensurate with our growing political and economic relationship. building and sustaining a positive and constructive relationship with china is essential to the success of our rebalancing strategy. finally, india, a key part of our rebalance, and more broadly an emerging power th
. young officers are promising and the old guard is not. the person driving reform in burma is not the young person. it is very interesting what is going on. maybe the pentagon is right. maybe things have gotten better. recently eight indonesian soldiers were killed by the local insurgency there. it is very small and very innocuous in many respects, but it's still having some legal capacities. we expected the tni to go next. they did not. it is not clear why. the jury is still out. as i said to some folks a few weeks ago, i do not think one could say that it is a sure thing that they have reformed. there is evidence that there is a lot of impunity still there and that if things get bloody enough there could be more abuses. neither of us really has the evidence to say we are right and the others are wrong. we are arguing with each other with and to do it. then there are other places like sri lanka and afghanistan and cambodia where i know we are right. the pentagon has a big problem. the can find a couple of navy units cannot involved in any political activities. you can trai
unleashes a country's potential. it helps to advance growth and progress. of a countrythink like burma for a minute. because of its steps towards democratic reform, a country that has been isolated for years is now making progress. has it reached for rwanda to be? no. but it is on the road. it is moving. more people are contributing to the economy and participating in the government, leading to faster growth and development. by starting to embrace universal rights the government is opening the doors to a stronger partnership with their neighborhood -- with their neighborhood in countries throughout the wor. many challenges remain. corruption has toe oted o remaing politica prisoners need to be freed. and horrible mob violence of recent days is another distressing reminder of how long it takes to build the habits of the heart. burma is likely to continue a long a promising path of renewal. for other countries in regions in transition, the way forward is much less clear. human rights will be a key factor in shaping their destinies. like the countries of the arab awakening, this is a mov
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